JIM LITTLE BOOKS
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  BROTHERHOOD OF DOOM: Memoirs of a Navy Nuclear Weaponsman was written in 2007. The book provides a look inside a national program that was shrouded in secrecy during the Cold War.
The book details the dedication and patriotism of a small group of sailors that were denied much of the liberty and freedoms that thier fellow citizens enjoyed, to insure the survival of America in the event of nuclear war. Emphasized throughout the book is the extraordinary effort by nuclear weaponsman to handle and maintain these weapons of mass destruction in readiness. The book is an effort to honor the many outstanding and colorful sailors Jim Little served with for thirty years and to educate the American public about a national program that little is known about, a program all citizens should be thankful for. The job of nuclear weaponsman no longer exists and Brotherhood of Doom is an attempt to preserve this important story of the American military. The book details a seventeen-year-old navy enlistee's joiurney in the Navy from the time of President Eisenhower's administration to that of President George H. Bush, and personality changes our nation and the U.S. Navy underwent during this time.


Dedication: To LTJG Douglas M. Webster, USS Ticonderoga
(CVA-14), VA-56, A-4, Skyhawk pilot who gave his life for his country, on December 5, 1965, while insuring readiness for nuclear war. To my forty-two shipmates listed within these pages who lost their lives serving their country. I was honored to have served with these heroes—may they never be forgotten.




James Little was born during the early years of World War II in the fertile farmlands of San Joaquin Valley, California. He has written a book, Brotherhood of Doom: Memoirs of a Navy Nuclear Weaponsman, detailing his naval career, which began with navy boot camp, an assignment aboard a hospital ship, and then schooling in Great Lakes, Illinois and, New Mexico. He was involved in the Cuban Missile Blockade, and the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, followed by five deployments during the Vietnam War. The book details his assignments aboard four aircraft carriers, and assignments at overseas locations, as well as two assignments in Albuquerque, New Mexico, as a “Mustang” (an officer who rose up through the enlisted ranks). His assignments as a nuclear weaponsman ranged from an assemblyman (wrench), to a position as an officer responsible for over one-third of the nation’s stockpile, and as a highly placed member of stockpile management, and planning committees. Also detailed in the book is his assignment as the first nuclear weaponsman to serve as a limited duty officer, and chief warrant officer detailer, and assignment officer in Washington, D.C. The book ends with his job as a Officer in Charge of a Sound Surveillance Underwater System (SOSUS) base, during the time of Desert Storm. During his 30-year career he was awarded 29 medals and ribbons, and various letters of appreciation and commendation. His highest award was the Meritorious Service Medal, awarded by the President of the United States.

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 Meritorious Service Medal, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, two awards of the Navy Commendation Medal, the Joint Meritorious Unit Award, the Navy Unit Commendation, two awards of the Meritorious Unit Commendation, three awards of the Navy “E” Ribbon, five Navy Good Conduct Medals, the Navy Expeditionary Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal (with star), three awards of the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the Navy Overseas Service Ribbon. The Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (gallantry cross color), the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal, and the Sharpshooter Pistol Ribbon. 


Life time Achievement Award, Strathmore Union High School, Strathmore, California 2008.

Since retiring from the Navy in 1991, Jim Little has been active in Veteran issues serving in a variety of positions such as: Military Officers of America, Coos Bay Chapter President for three years. Southern Oregon Warbirds Association President for three years. Douglas County Veterans Forum President for four years. Veteran of Foreign Wars Chapter 2468 Vice Commander for two years. Vice Commander American Legion Post 16 for 1 year.

While President of the Douglas County Veterans Forum a campaign conducted by the group called "Save our Roseburg VA Hospital" This campaign culminated in passage of Oregon State legislature House Joint Memorial 26 which supported the restoration of the hospital to a full service hospital...this campaign continues to this day.

Below is a book review of Brotherhood of Doom published in 2008 by Mr. Bill Duncan a highly respected news reporter and friend of Jim Little. Bill was a Marine veteran and widely published author. His latest book published by his widow Ada You Had To Be There published in 2014 is available at www. WilliamJDuncan.com  

A revealing book about the nuclear issues shrouded in secrecy during the Cold War, ""Brotherhood of Doom: Memoirs of a Navy Nuclear Weaponsman," by Roseburg's Jim Little, made me reflect on an incident in my own past.

In early October of 1962, as a newsman in California, I was returning to Los Angeles from an assignment in San Diego. Near Oceanside on Interstate 5, I encountered a northbound Marine Corps military convoy that stretched for miles. I recognized the trucks filled with Marines in full combat gear. When a reporter sees such a large military movement, his news nose twitches.

I stopped in Santa Ana, Calif., and telephoned the Marine Corps air station at El Toro where the convoy was headed. The Marine public information officer gave me alibi copy that the large contingent of Marines was simply going on maneuvers. Other contacts were met with the same response. Instinct told me there was more to the story than what the military was saying.

That night proved me right. President John F. Kennedy announced that U.S. reconnaissance photographs taken by an American U-2 spy plane revealed missile bases being built in Cuba. It was the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Marines were combat-ready for an invasion of Cuba.

Life has many twists and turns, and what was happening in 1962 affected 19-year-old Jim Little, a nuclear weaponsman with the U. S. Navy. Soon he would be aboard the aircraft carrier USS Independence off the coast of Cuba, and would be prepared to arm Navy aircraft as part of the deterrent ordered by the president. In his speech, Kennedy had said any nuclear missile launched from Cuba against any nation in the Western Hemisphere would be considered an attack on the United States, requiring a full retaliatory response upon the Soviet Union.

It was the closest this nation came to armed conflict with the Soviets in the Cold War. Two weeks later, the Russians removed the missiles from Cuba. That harrowing experience was just one of several Chief Warrant Officer James Little would have in his 30-year naval career. Now retired, Little is the president of the Southern Oregon War Birds and vice president of the local Veterans of Foreign Wars post, as well as a founding member of the Douglas County Veteran's Forum.

"Brotherhood of Doom" is a personal account of his naval career, which put him in harm's way not only in the Cuban Missile Crisis, but also on five deployments during the Vietnam War, including the Gulf of Tonkin incident. He also took part in Desert Storm.

Of the controversial Gulf of Tonkin incident, Little said that despite all the claims that it was a hoax to involve American troops more extensively in the Vietnam War, he personally witnessed aircraft returning to the USS Ticonderoga with bullet holes. "From my limited viewpoint," he said, "it happened and our ships were under attack." He said the crew aboard the carrier was at general quarters (combat readiness) for two to three weeks during that time.

While it is a personal memoir, Little tells of the dedication and patriotism of enlisted personnel in the Navy. He himself is what is called a "mustang," an officer who rose from the ranks of the enlisted men. Throughout the book he does not minimize the safety hazards and extraordinary courage of those who handle and maintain weapons of mass destruction.

The book's cover is an original watercolor painting by Little of two A-6 Intruder carrier-based medium attack bombers streaking away from a blast of a nuclear weapon on a target, complete with the familiar mushroom cloud billowing above the target.

Little's birthday is Dec. 8, and it was on that date in 1991 that the Soviet Union ceased to exist.

"This was the nicest birthday present I could imagine," Little said. He is still perplexed that there is so little fanfare over the end of the Cold War, which had been such a large part of life and caused so much dread in America.

"The book is my effort to honor the many outstanding sailors I served with during my career and to tell the reading public about a national program of which so little is known, a program for which all citizens should be thankful," he said.

Little's last duty station was the Coos Head Naval Facility in Coos Bay. He retired Feb. 28, 1991, and he and his wife, Carmen, settled in Roseburg.

The job of nuclear weaponsman ceased to exist in 1997, several years after President George H. Bush ordered all tactical nuclear weapons removed from naval ships.

On March 13, a Japanese film crew will visit Little here in Roseburg for preliminary interviews about a documentary based on his book on the Cold War. Little said he understands the filming will begin in May.

How was he able to put together 30 years of memories so accurately in his 424-page memoir? Little gives credit to his mother.

"My mother surprised me by presenting me with a ribbon-tied box, which I discovered contained every letter I had written her while in the Navy. If it where not for her, these memoirs would never have been possible."

Bill Duncan passed away in 2011 he was the editor of The Senior Times. He also wrote a weekly column on the Opinion Page of The News-Review each Thursday.



BROTHER HOOD OF DOOM IS AVAILABLE in both paperback or as an E-Book AT:

Amazon

http://www.amazon.com/BROTHERHOOD-DOOM-Memoirs-Nuclear-Weaponsman/dp/1601453116/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1314756609&sr=1-1

Barnes & Noble: 

http://www.amazon.com/BROTHERHOOD-DOOM-Memoirs-Nuclear-Weaponsman/dp/1601453116/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1314756609&sr=1-1

BOOKLOCKER PUBLISHING:

http://booklocker.com/books/3222.html


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"Jim"








James (Jim) Little was born during the early years of World War II in the fertile farmlands of San Joaquin Valley, California. He has written a book, Brotherhood of Doom: Memoirs of a Navy Nuclear Weaponsman, detailing his naval career, which began with navy boot camp, an assignment aboard a hospital ship, and then schooling in Great Lakes, Illinois and, New Mexico. He was involved in the Cuban Missile Blockade, and the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, followed by five deployments during the Vietnam War. The book details his assignments aboard four aircraft carriers, and assignments at overseas locations, as well as two assignments in Albuquerque, New Mexico, as a “Mustang” (an officer who rose up through the enlisted ranks). His assignments as a nuclear weaponsman ranged from an assemblyman (wrench turner), to a position as an officer responsible for over one-third of the nation’s stockpile, and as a highly placed member of stockpile management, and planning committees. Also detailed in the book is his assignment as the first nuclear weaponsman to serve as a limited duty officer, and chief warrant officer detailer, and assignment officer in Washington, D.C. The book ends with his job as a Officer in Charge of a Sound Surveillance Underwater System (SOSUS) base, during the time of Desert Storm. During his 30-year career he was awarded 29 medals and ribbons, and various letters of appreciation and commendation. His highest award was the Meritorious Service Medal, awarded by the President of the United States.






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